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CLFN and city to lobby province about Casino Dene entryway on Highway 28

Cold Lake will join Cold Lake First Nations in lobbying the provincial government to look at a dangerous intersection on Highway 28.

The intersection with an entryway to Casino Dene along Highway 28 has two lanes going to northbound, but going up the Beaver River Hill southbound there is one lane, which CLFN and the city want to be addressed.

It will be the launching point for a larger discussion about twinning Highway 28.

“It’s ridiculous how bad that highway is and it’s really failing this year if anyone’s driven on it,” said Mayor Craig Copeland.

“We’ve always lobbied for at least twinning it. But certainly anyone that’s coming from Cold Lake and going southbound up towards the casino, there’s just one lane up the hill and then turning towards the casino. It’s a huge safety hazard both north and south when you’re travelling.”

The city will pen a letter from the City of Cold Lake to the Government of Alberta asking for a joint meeting between the Ministry of Transportation, Cold Lake First Nations, and the city, with the potential for the M.D. of Bonnyville to get involved, said Copeland.

“We’re improving our community and yet the province isn’t there to invest in these interchanges. You look at the M.D. of Bonnyville and all the money they’re putting into Ardmore right now, where is Alberta Transportation on twinning that road?

“We’re going to work with Cold Lake First Nations and present it to our MLA Dave Hanson and get the Reeve and go see the Minister of Transportation and try to get some money at least at the casino, but look at the bigger picture of Highway 28.”

At city council Tuesday, councillor Bob Buckle questioned why there wasn’t consultation between Cold Lake First Nations and Alberta Transportation on the intersection in the first place.